Social Media Monitoring – when more is not enough

Social Media Monitoring and Intelligence (SMM) tools source content from a wide variety of sources. Most of the times, these include:

Regular web sites
Blogs and public blog hosts such as Blogger, WordPress, and Tumblr
Video and audio sharing sites like YouTube and DailyMotion
Public micro-blogging services, mainly Twitter
Public Social Networking venues such as Facebook, Link…

Read More

Post abstract cross-posted from Real Story Group.

Beware shortcuts when mobilizing existing web sites

Have you tried accessing a web site from your mobile device and felt disappointed? I get that feeling often and wonder what it takes for site owners to think of “mobile first”?
One of the fastest ways to mobilize your existing websites is to license special mobile middleware tools.  These tools access source content on your existing site but then apply a mobile-friendly layout to it…

Read More

Post abstract cross-posted from Real Story Group.

New Digital Asset Management Maturity Model

I wanted to hit a century (my 100th blog post) with a really nice topic. And what could be better than this?
I’m excited and proud to announce the new Digital Asset Management Maturity Model (DAM3). Its a collaborative effort between us, Optimity Advisors, DAM Foundation and Henry Stewart. I’m especially happy because personally for me, it was a rewarding experience to work with some of the world’…

Read More

Post abstract cross-posted from Real Story Group.

Oracle announces new version of Fatwire — a.k.a., WebCenter Sites

Last week, Oracle announced a new version 11gR1 of WebCenter Sites. This is the erstwhile FatWire product, “Oracalized” — a bit — for the first time since the acquisition last year.
So how far has Oracle progressed? Well, there’s a new contributor UI, a new page builder, deprecation of SOAP-based Web Services, dropped support for JBoss application server, and some other changes…

Read More

Post abstract cross-posted from Real Story Group.

FT.com bets on HTML5 in lieu of native apps

The esteemed Financial Times is ready to pull the plug on its iOS native apps and instead replace them with an HTML5-based app.
Reportedly, the so called “Apple Tax” — whereby developers pay 30% of revenues to Apple — along with lack of access to customer data, are the main reasons prompting FT.com to follow others (including Amazon who did the same thing with their Kindle app).
Many a…

Read More

Post abstract cross-posted from Real Story Group.